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Instructions for Selectees

For Diversity Visa Program Randomly Selected Entrants

How to Begin

If you receive notification that you have been selected for further processing in the Diversity Visa program, you must successfully complete the following steps before a diversity immigrant visa interview can be scheduled to determine if you will receive a visa. It is important for you to complete the next steps as quickly as possible.

Contacting KCC: If you need to contact the KCC, always refer to your name and case number exactly as they appear on your original Selectee Letter. Your case number should be clearly written in the upper right hand corner of all documents and correspondence sent to the KCC. The KCC telephone number is 606-526-7500 (7:30am until 4:00pm EST), or send an E-mail inquiry to KCCDV@state.gov.

The principal diversity visa applicant must have a high school education, or its equivalent, or two years of qualifying work experience, under provisions of United States (U.S.) law. This was explained in the DV Instructions for your eDV entry.

High School Education: A high school education means successful completion of a formal course of elementary and secondary education comparable to completion of a 12-year course in the U.S.

Work Experience: If you are qualifying with work experience, you must have two years of experience in the last five years, in an occupation which, by U.S. Department of Labor definitions, requires at least two years of training or experience that is designated as Job Zone 4 or 5, classified in a Specific Vocational Preparation (SVP) rating of 7.0 or higher. The U.S. Department of Labor provides information on job duties, knowledge and skills, education and training, and other occupational characteristics at their website http://online.onetcenter.org/. The O*Net online database groups work experience into five "job zones." While many occupations are listed, only certain specified occupations qualify for the Diversity Visa Program.

How To Find the Qualifying Occupations on the Department of Labor Website: Qualifying DV Occupations are shown on the Department of Labor O*Net Online Database Follow these steps, when you are in O*Net Online to find out if your occupation qualifies:

  • Under "Find Occupations" select "Job Family" from the pull down;
  • Then Browse by “Job Family”. (For example, select Architecture and Engineering) and click "GO";
  • Then click on the link for your specific occupation.  (As an example, select Aerospace Engineers. At the bottom of this Summary Report for Aerospace Engineers, under the Job Zone section, you will find the designated Job Zone 4, SVP Range, 7.0 to < 8.0. This means using this example, Aerospace Engineering is a qualifying occupation.)

If you do not have either the required education or qualifying work experience, you are not eligible to be issued a diversity visa. Only you, as the principal applicant, must meet this requirement. Your spouse and children do not have to meet this requirement. Do not continue with this application if you do not meet the qualifying education or work experience requirements explained above.

When the DV Selectee is Overseas or is Already in the U.S. - Next Steps are Different

  • Diversity visa selectee overseas >> Follow Step 2 to Step 4, starting below.
  • Diversity visa selectee already in the United States >> When the principal (primary) diversity visa selectee is already physically present in the U.S., you may be eligible to apply to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services for adjustment of status. Click Adjust Status to learn more.

All applicants must complete the following forms, which can be downloaded by clicking the form number:

  • Supplemental Registration for the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program, Form DSP-122: Only the principal applicant needs to complete Form DSP-122.
  • Application for Immigrant Visa and Alien Registration, Form DS-230, Part I and II: The principal applicant and all family members applying for a diversity visa must submit both Part I and II.
  • Note: Each Form DS-230 Part II, Sworn Statement should be submitted unsigned.
  • Two (2) photographs of yourself and of each family member applying for a diversity immigrant visa. Ensure that the photos comply with the General Photo Requirements.

Note: Family members refer only to your spouse and unmarried children who had not reached age 21 before you entered the lottery. If you have gotten married, or had additional children since entering the DV lottery, or your immediate family situation has changed, include notification of these changes by sending an updated Form DS-230 to the Kentucky Consular Center.

Submitting your documents

Submit each completed form listed above and photographs for yourself and your family members to the address below. In addition, be sure to include the barcode sheet from your original selectee notification letter.

U.S. Department of State
Kentucky Consular Center
3505 North Highway 25W
Williamsburg, KY 40769
U.S.A.

Obtain the documents listed below and follow these procedures. It is strongly recommended that you begin this process early.

Instructions for Submitting Civil Documents to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate

The applicant and each family member who will accompany the applicant to the United States will need to submit original documents or certified copies of the documents from an appropriate office (authority, or issuing entity) in your country. You will be required to bring these documents to your visa interview at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate, along with translations required as explained below.

Translation Requirements

All documents not in English, or in the official language of the country in which application for a visa is being made, must be accompanied by certified translations. The translation must include a statement signed by the translator that states that the:

  • Translation is accurate, and,
  • Translator is competent to translate.

Requirements

Review these requirements regarding civil documents you will need to obtain before your interview at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate. Please do not send any civil documents to the Kentucky Consular Center.

Required DV Qualifying Education or Work Experience
The principal diversity visa applicant must have a high school education, or its equivalent, OR two years of qualifying work experience in the last five years.

Education: Submit to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate at your interview, a certificate of completion equivalent to a U.S. diploma, school transcripts, or other evidence issued by the person or organization responsible for maintaining records, which specifies the completed course of study. The diversity visa selectee must have completed a 12-year course of elementary and secondary education in the U.S. or a comparable course of study in another country, sufficient in itself to qualify a student to apply for college admission. The following are not acceptable:

  • Equivalency certificates (such as the G.E.D.) are not acceptable.
  • Vocational degrees that are not considered a basis for further academic study will not be considered equivalent to U.S. high school education.

Work Experience: Submit documentation to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate at your interview demonstrating that you have two years of qualifying work experience in the last five years immediately prior to application. Qualifying work experience must be in an occupation that, by U.S. Department of Labor O*Net Online Database definitions, requires at least two years of training or experience that is designated as Job Zone 4 or 5, classified in a Specific Vocational Preparation (SVP) rating of 7.0 or higher. (See Step 1 for information about using O*Net Online.)

Birth Certificate
Each applicant will need to obtain an original birth certificate issued by the official custodian of birth records in the country of birth, showing the date and place of birth and the parentage of the applicant, based upon the original registration of birth. Submit to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate at your interview. Important Notice: All Immigrant Visa applicants must submit a long form original birth certificate. Short form birth certificates will not be accepted.

The certificate must contain the:

  • Person's date of birth;
  • Person's place of birth;
  • Names of both parents; and,
  • Annotation by the appropriate authority indicating that it is an extract from the official records.

Unobtainable birth certificates

The applicant's birth record may not be obtainable. Some reasons are listed below:

  • The applicant's birth was never officially recorded.
  • The applicant's birth records have been destroyed.
  • The appropriate government authority will not issue one.

Please obtain a certified statement from the appropriate government authority stating the reason the applicant's birth record is not available. With the certified statement the applicant must submit secondary evidence. For example:

  • A baptismal certificate that contains the date and place of birth, as well as both parents' names (providing the baptism took place shortly after birth).
  • An adoption decree for an adopted child.

Note: An affidavit must be executed before an official authorized to take oaths or affirmations. An affidavit from a close relative, preferably the applicant's mother, stating the date and place of birth, both parents names, and the mother's maiden name.

Court and Prison Records
Applicants who have been convicted of a crime must obtain a certified copy of each court record and any prison record, regardless of the fact that he or she may have subsequently benefited from an amnesty, pardon or other act of clemency. Submit to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate at your interview. Court records should include:

  • Complete information regarding the circumstance surrounding the crime of which the applicant was convicted:
  • The disposition of the case, including sentence or other penalty or fine imposed.

Deportation Documentation
Applicants who have previously been deported or removed at government expense from the United States must obtain Form I-212, Permission to Reapply after Deportation, from the U.S. Citizenship or Immigration Services or from a U.S. Embassy or Consulate, and follow the instructions included on that form.

Marriage Certificate
Married applicants must obtain an original marriage certificate, or a certified copy, bearing the appropriate seal or stamp of the issuing authority. Submit this to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate at your interview.

Note: Marriage certificates from certain countries are unavailable. More specific information is available online on the Reciprocity by Country webpage.

Marriage Termination Documentation
Applicants who have been previously married must obtain evidence of the termination of EACH prior marriage. Evidence submitted to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate must be in the form of original documents issued by a competent authority, or certified copies bearing the appropriate seal or stamp of the issuing authority, such as:

  • Final divorce decree
  • Death certificate
  • Annulment papers

Military Records
Persons who have served in the military forces of any country must obtain a copy of their military record. Submit documentation to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate at your interview.

Note: Military records from certain countries are unavailable. More specific information is available online on the Reciprocity by Country webpage.

Police Records
Which Applicants Need to Submit a Police Certificate

Each applicant aged 16 years or older must submit police certificates to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate at your interview.

What Does the Applicant Submit

The applicant must submit police certificates that meet the following guidelines. The police certificate must:

  • Cover the entire period of the applicant's residence in that area.
  • Be issued by the appropriate police authority.
  • Include all arrests, the reason for the arrest(s), and the disposition of each case of which there is a record.

How to obtain a police certificate

  1. Determine from which countries an applicant is required to obtain police certificates. The table below will assist in determining from where an applicant must obtain police certificates. Note: Present and former residents of the United States should NOT obtain any police certificates covering their residence in the U.S.
  2. Contact the appropriate police authorities. Selecting the appropriate country from the Reciprocity by Country page will provide you with additional information on how to obtain a police certificate.

IMPORTANT NOTICE ABOUT POLICE CERTIFICATES: The Reciprocity by Country pages will indicate if a country's police authorities require the submission of a specific Police Certificate Request form. Some countries may require the submission of specific Police Certificate Request forms in order to properly request and obtain the applicable Police Certificate(s).

Note: Police certificates from certain countries are unavailable. More specific information is available online on the Reciprocity by Country webpage.

When the Applicant Needs a Police Certificate

IF the applicant… AND… THEN the applicant needs a police certificate from…
is living in their country of nationality at their current residence for more than 6 months is 16 years old or older the police authorities of that locality.
lived in a different part of their country of nationality for more than 6 months was 16 years old or older at that time the police authorities of that locality.
lived in a different country for more than 12 months was 16 years or older at that time the police authorities of that locality.
was arrested for any reason, regardless of how long they lived there was any age at that time the police authorities of that locality.

Custody Documentation
For adopted children, the adoptive parent must provide:

  1. A certified copy of the adoption decree;
  2. The legal custody decree; if custody occurred before the adoption;
  3. A statement showing dates and places where child resided with the parents; and
  4. If the child was adopted while aged 16 or 17 years, evidence that the child was adopted together with, or subsequent to the adoption of, a natural sibling under age 16 by the same adoptive parent(s).

Embassy-Specific Guidelines: There may be information about how to obtain civil documentation from the required issuing office (authority) in your country, as examples, for police certificates, marriage certificates and military records. The U.S. Embassy or Consulate where your interview will occur has information which may assist you. To learn about Embassy or Consulate specific requirements that may apply to you, follow these steps for finding information in the links to the Reciprocity section (link in sections above):

  • First, select your country from the Reciprocity by Country webpage drop down menu.
  • Then select "Jump to Country Documents" to go to civil document instructions for your country.

After all of your forms have been received and approved by the Kentucky Consular Center (KCC), based on visa availability, you may receive an interview appointment letter indicating the date, time, and location of your visa interview. You will need to be present at the interview, as well as your spouse and children (as applicable) who are applying for a diversity immigrant visa.

Note: The completed original Form(s) DS-230, Form DS-122 and photographs you submitted in Step 2, will be sent by KCC to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you will be interviewed.

Medical Exam

Before your interview, diversity visa applicants will need to have completed the required medical exam, including required vaccinations. You will need to schedule your medical exam appointment. Review Medical Exam and Physicians for a list of required Panel Physicians in your country, instructions for the medical exam and medical exam frequently asked questions (FAQs).

Note: On the Panel Physicians List, select the Embassy/Consulate where you will be interviewed. Unlike case numbers for all other immigrant visa categories, DV case numbers do not contain three-letter codes for the Embassy/Consulate where your case will be processed.

Interview Preparation

You should prepare thoroughly and carefully for your interview. Failure to be fully prepared for your interview at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate can result in delay or denial of the visa. It is important that you follow any additional instructions provided by the Embassy or Consulate on the Interview Preparation – Embassy Guidelines webpage.

Note: On the US Embassy/Consulate Specific Information List, select the Embassy/Consulate where you will be interviewed. Unlike case numbers for all other immigrant visa categories, DV case numbers do not contain three-letter codes for the Embassy/Consulate where your case will be processed.

Required Documentation

At your interview you must bring the following;

  • Selectee notification letter which you received from KCC.
  • Passport(s) valid for six months beyond the intended date of entry into the U.S. for you and each family member applying for a visa
  • Original documents or certified copies of all applicable civil documents listed in the Step 3 instructions.

Original Document Requirements

The applicant and each family member who will accompany the applicant to the United States will need to submit original documents or certified copies of the documents listed in section Step 3 from an appropriate office (authority, or issuing entity) in your country.

Translation Requirements - Follow instructions provided in Step 3 Obtaining Your Civil Documents.

Fee Payment

At your visa interview you must pay the DV lottery fee. Learn more about Fees. You should make arrangements to have payment available before your interview date and time, following the instructions of the U.S. embassy or consulate where you will be interviewed. Other fees an applicant can expect include medical exam fees, as an example.

When You Have Your Diversity Immigrant Visa - What You Should Know

If you are issued a diversity immigrant visa, the consular officer will give you your passport containing the immigrant visa and a sealed packet containing the documents which you provided. It is important that you do not open the sealed packed. Only the U.S. immigration official should open this packet when you enter the United States. You are required to enter the United States before the expiration date printed on your visa. When traveling, the primary (or principal) applicant must enter the United States before or at the same time as family members holding visas.

If you receive your immigrant visa on or after February 1, 2013, you must pay the USCIS Immigrant Fee to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) after you receive your immigrant visa and before you travel to the United States. Select USCIS Immigrant Fee on the USCIS website for more information.

Important Notice: USCIS will not issue a Permanent Resident Card (Form I-551 or Green Card) until you have paid the fee.

How to Contact Kentucky Consular Center

If you need to contact the Kentucky Consular Center (KCC) you must always refer to your name and case number exactly as they appear on your original Selectee Letter. Your case number should be clearly written in the upper right hand corner of ALL documents and correspondence sent to the KCC.

The KCC telephone number is 606-526-7500 (7:30am until 4:00pm EST), or send an E-mail inquiry to KCCDV@state.gov

About Us

USA Green Card is a non-government organization specializing in the professional handling of your Green Card Lottery registration with the US State Department. Our service offers to manage your entire diversity visa application process from start to finish. Learn more.
Official US Government Program

The congressionally mandated Diversity Immigrant Visa Program is administered on an annual basis by the Department of State and conducted based on United States law, specifically Section 203(c) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). This law provides for a class of immigrants known as “diversity immigrants,” with visas made available to persons from countries with historically low rates of immigration to the United States. The annual DV program makes 50,000 visas available to persons meeting simple, but strict, eligibility requirements. A computer-generated, random drawing chooses selectees for DVs. The visas are distributed among six geographic regions, and within each region, no single country may receive more than seven percent of the available DVs in any one year. Visas are allocated to nationals of countries with historically lower rates of US immigration. Nationals of countries who have sent more than 50,000 immigrants to the United States over the past five years are not eligible to apply for the Diversity Visa program. The Department of State implemented the electronic registration system beginning with DV-2005 in order to make the DV process more efficient and secure. The Department utilizes special technology and other means to identify those who commit fraud for the purposes of illegal immigration or those who submit multiple entries.
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Morocco
DV-2009 Candidates
USA Green Card is an independent organization and is not affiliated with the US Government. You can register in the Diversity Visa Program at www.state.gov. We offer a professional service for application preparation, review, submission, and tracking that requires payment of a fee. Reproduction of this website in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.
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